Culture

Historian Alan Wilson: The Truth about King Arthur

King-Arthur-Camelot

“Ancient Celtic chronicles portray Arthur as a descendant of Christian Galatians [Gaul], who received one of Apostle Paul’s letters [c.40 AD], and a Gaul military commander who slaughtered demon possessed witches and marauding giants.” – KillingIreland.com, pg.252

By Lisa Phillips, OpDeepState, 1/11/2018

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Alan Wilson is a British historian specializing in the origins and ancient history of the British and the history of the ancient British kings including two real King Arthurs.

Arthurian research: In 1976, after a chance meeting with historical researcher, Anthony Thomas ‘Baram’ Blackett, at the public library in Newcastle upon Tyne, the two men decided to put up many thousands of pounds of their own money to fund full-time research into the origins of King Arthur.

The Arthurian stories, so popular today, came out of South-Eastern Wales into France, via the Normans, in the 12th century and this encouraged them to start their search in the same place. The search soon moved beyond Wales to include the English Midlands which had been dominated by the old Welsh Kingdoms for centuries.

To date, Wilson and Blackett have published seven books that provide information based upon Old Welsh records that date to the 12th Century. They believe that these provide a final solution to the King Arthur story and have clearly identified the true sites of the battles of Badon (Mynydd Baedan) and Camlann.

In 1983, Wilson and Blackett discovered what they believe to be King Arthur’s memorial stone at the small ruined church of St Peter-super-Montem on Mynydd-y-Gaer in Mid-Glamorgan, which they subsequently purchased. The stone was offered to the National Museum of Wales (Amguedda Werin Cymru) for analysis, but the offer was not taken up.

Subsequently it went on public display in various venues for some time. Following this, they employed the services of two archaeologists, (Professor Eric Talbot and Alan Wishart) in 1990, to lead a dig at the same place. During the excavations, which were authorised by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, several artefacts were discovered including an ancient axe, a knife and a small cross weighing two and a half pounds, that reads “Pro Anima Artorius” (“For The Soul Of Arthur”).

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